PDF/EPUB Malcolm Gladwell ´ Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People ´

THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLERCompelling haunting tragic storiesresonate long after you put the book down James McConnachie Sunday Times Book of the Year The routine traffic stop that ends in tragedy The spy who spends years undetected at the highest levels of the Pentagon The false conviction of Amanda Knox Why do we so often get other people wrong? Why is it so hard to detect a lie read a face or judge a strangers motives?Using stories of deceit and fatal errors to cast doubt on our strategies for dealing with the unknown Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual adventure into the darker side of human nature where strangers are never simple and misreading them can have disastrous conseuencesTHE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLERCompelling haunting tragic stories resonate long after you put the book down James McConnachie Sunday Times Book of the YearThe routine traffic stop that ends in tragedy The spy who spends years undetected at the highest levels of the Pentagon The false conviction of Amanda Knox Why do we so often get other people wrong? Why is it so hard to detect a lie read a face or judge a strangers motives?Using stories of deceit and fatal errors to cast doubt on our strategies for dealing with the unknown Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual adventure into the darker side of human nature where strangers are never simple and misreading them can have disastrous conseuencesTHE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLERCompelling haunting tragic stories resonate long after you put the book down James McConnachie Sunday Times Book of the YearThe routine traffic stop that ends in tragedy The spy who spends years undetected at the highest levels of the Pentagon The false conviction of Amanda Knox Why do we so often get other people wrong? Why is it so hard to detect a lie read a face or judge a strangers motives?Using stories of deceit and fatal errors to cast doubt on our strategies for dealing with the unknown Malcolm Gladwell takes us on an intellectual adventure into the darker side of human nature where strangers are never simple and misreading them can have disastrous conseuences


6 thoughts on “Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don’t Know

  1. says:

    Sorry but I did not like this book The best thing I can say is that it is well written very fluent and conversational as one would expect from a top New Yorker writer I have never read anything else by Malcolm Gladwell as far as I know but I was curious and even a bit excited to try this out because he is so well known for influential books such as The Tipping PointHowever I'm afraid this book has nothing to say It is a compendium of interesting crime cases and celebrated moments from history and popular culture ranging from Hitler to Friends to 911 and a whole load of controversial court cases with some examination of suicide as a diversion For the first half of it and it's a very uick read so do give it a try if you are inclined to doubt my criticism I just found myself wondering “where is he going with this? What is the thesis? What is his point?”Ostensibly the book is about whether or not we can judge strangers I think But many of the examples that he draws on have no apparent lesson Many of them are nice little vignettes which show how broad ranging the author's mind is and would make good “dinner party anecdotes” but rather in a mansplaining vein where you tell someone that what they think about Chamberlain and Hitler is so wrong because there's so much to it But actually they’re rightThere are digressions via Cuban spies Bernie Madoff Jerry Sandusky and Amanda Knox All nicely told But what does the book actually tell us? Sorry Mr Gladwell I got nothing


  2. says:

    CONTAINS SPOILERSThis is a thought provoking book on the premise that the majority of people are unable to tell whether a stranger is trustworthyThe author starts and ends with the true tragic case of 28 year old African American Sandra Bland who in 2015 was pulled over by a traffic cop in Texas arrested and committed suicide in her jail cell three days laterChapters detail famous cases of the conseuences of trusting – Montezuma and Cortes Chamberlain and Hitler spies undetected for years in high places I couldn’t see the relevance of all the cases for example the drunken rape case interrogation methods and the Amanda Knox trials A better example might have been the Lindy Chamberlain dingo case to demonstrate how people mistrust innocent people whose body language does not match our expectationsGladwell asks “why can’t we tell when the stranger in front of us is lying?” He suggests that those recruiting or judges setting bail make better choices based on what they hear or read rather than on who they are looking at He also suggests that to keep society harmonious we default to a position of trustWe all know that those younger prettier taller better dressed and educated – and in some cases whiter – have an advantage in life I could add examples to the author’s our former children’s laureate Malorie Blackman who was singled out in a first class carriage for a ticket check the way the family of Stephen Lawrence were treated by the policeI was still struggling to keep up and follow the train of thought at the chapter on coupling the theory that for example if someone wants to commit suicide and at the perfect and ideal time the perfect and ideal method presents itself they will go ahead otherwise they might not carry out the actI have read the transcript of the exchange between the cop and Sandra Bland and also watched a video of the exchange The cop who was rightly subseuently sacked uickly became aggressive But so did Bland – even the fact she lit a cigarette early in the exchange shocked me These were two people with supressed anger and aggression resentment and preconceived judgements on both sides that escalated into disasterIt turns out that the tragic Bland who had a promising life ahead of her had a troubled past Certainly she should never have been pulled over during an aggressive and unnecessary “stop and search” programmeI also struggle to place the incident in the context of life in America living as I do in England It seems a uniuely American encounter to me I cannot imagine anyone lighting a cigarette when pulled over by the police unless wishing for further antagonism and British cops do not – yet – carry guns But we currently have the situation here where anyone criticizing a certain new royal princess for acting like a prima donna film star flashing her cash is called “racist” when please look at her – olive skin and sleek straight hair It’s nothing to do with her background – her sister in law got eual flack for her mother’s profession It’s about behaviours and we need to carefully separate the two and challenge our own and others preconceptionsMalorie Blackman politely challenged the ticket inspector “Aren’t you going to check anyone else’s ticket?” The family of Stephen Lawrence gained nationwide respect for their uiet dignity in their fight for justice Sandra Bland was treated appallingly humiliated and isolated and she didn’t have the resources internal or external to overcome that treatment spending her last days sobbing alone in her cell A dreadful damning example of policing gone awry Perhaps she suspected she never would have found redress after release This book I hope will in some way make up for that and I salute the author for it


  3. says:

    Well written an easy read Lots of interesting stories?But and it is a big but What is the point of the book? There don't seen to be any startling insights The vignettes are over used and repetitive There's almost nothing on solutions In conclusion a shallow second rate book Pity


  4. says:

    Somehow I was expecting rather from this celebrated author I am about halfway through and have found it to be a series of stories which make the same basic point There is nothing intriguing to get your teeth into and have found the book shallow and very disappointing Two stars is probably generous


  5. says:

    I had to go to the end of this book to get the message It is powerful but the way the author presents it to the readers is very difficult to understand at firstThe situations and facts he uses are thrown in the book and leave you wondering what does it have to do with the title of the book What does he mean by talking to strangersThe author presents three concepts and bias humans have when interacting with others the ones we are not familiar with and they all make sense but the examples are poorly chosenHowever by the end of the book you understand a bit and you are able to forgive the author for the bad choice of title and structure of the bookIt’s written very well but badly structuredYou can read in a few hours so worth a go


  6. says:

    This is a book for the journey and not for the end All the way through the book the author uses his literal ingenuity to package some interesting stories and ideasHowever I do feel that the end wasn't as satisfying as the journey and he could have got to the conclusion without the journey but it was a great ride none the lessI felt enlightened by reading this book