ePUB A Cheesemonger's History of The British Isles PDF/EPUB ☆ papercuts.co

'A beautifully textured tour around the cheeseboard' Simon Garfield'Full of flavour' Sunday Times'A delightful and informative romp a fine Christmas present along with a wedge of Sparkenhoe Red Leicester' Bee Wilson Guardian'His encounters with modern day practitioners fizz with infectious delight' John Walsh Sunday TimesShortlisted for the André Simon Food and Drink Book Awards for 2020Every cheese tells a story Whether it's a fresh young goat's cheese or a big beefy eighteen month old Cheddar each variety holds the history of the people who first made it from the builders of Stonehenge to medieval monks from the Stilton makers of the eighteenth century to the factory cheesemakers of the Second World WarCheesemonger Ned Palmer takes us on a delicious journey across Britain and Ireland and through time to uncover the histories of beloved old favourites like Cheddar and Wensleydale and fresh innovations like the Irish Cashel Blue or the rambunctious Renegade Monk Along the way we learn the craft and culture of cheesemaking from the eccentric and engaging characters who have revived and reinvented farmhouse and artisan traditions And we get to know the major cheese styles the blues washed rinds semi softs and uniue to the British Isles the territorials and discover how best to enjoy them on a cheeseboard with a glass of Riesling or as a Welsh rarebit alongside a pint of Pale AleThis is a cheesemonger's odyssey a celebration of history innovation and taste and the book all cheese and history lovers will want to devour this Christmas'A beautifully textured tour around the cheeseboard' Simon Garfield'Full of flavour' Sunday Times'A delightful and informative romp a fine Christmas present along with a wedge of Sparkenhoe Red Leicester' Bee Wilson Guardian'His encounters with modern day practitioners fizz with infectious delight' John Walsh Sunday TimesShortlisted for the André Simon Food and Drink Book Awards for 2020Every cheese tells a story Whether it's a fresh young goat's cheese or a big beefy eighteen month old Cheddar each variety holds the history of the people who first made it from the builders of Stonehenge to medieval monks from the Stilton makers of the eighteenth century to the factory cheesemakers of the Second World WarCheesemonger Ned Palmer takes us on a delicious journey across Britain and Ireland and through time to uncover the histories of beloved old favourites like Cheddar and Wensleydale and fresh innovations like the Irish Cashel Blue or the rambunctious Renegade Monk Along the way we learn the craft and culture of cheesemaking from the eccentric and engaging characters who have revived and reinvented farmhouse and artisan traditions And we get to know the major cheese styles the blues washed rinds semi softs and uniue to the British Isles the territorials and discover how best to enjoy them on a cheeseboard with a glass of Riesling or as a Welsh rarebit alongside a pint of Pale AleThis is a cheesemonger's odyssey a celebration of history innovation and taste and the book all cheese and history lovers will want to devour this Christmas'A beautifully textured tour around the cheeseboard' Simon Garfield'Full of flavour' Sunday Times'A delightful and informative romp a fine Christmas present along with a wedge of Sparkenhoe Red Leicester' Bee Wilson Guardian'His encounters with modern day practitioners fizz with infectious delight' John Walsh Sunday TimesShortlisted for the André Simon Food and Drink Book Awards for 2020Every cheese tells a story Whether it's a fresh young goat's cheese or a big beefy eighteen month old Cheddar each variety holds the history of the people who first made it from the builders of Stonehenge to medieval monks from the Stilton makers of the eighteenth century to the factory cheesemakers of the Second World WarCheesemonger Ned Palmer takes us on a delicious journey across Britain and Ireland and through time to uncover the histories of beloved old favourites like Cheddar and Wensleydale and fresh innovations like the Irish Cashel Blue or the rambunctious Renegade Monk Along the way we learn the craft and culture of cheesemaking from the eccentric and engaging characters who have revived and reinvented farmhouse and artisan traditions And we get to know the major cheese styles the blues washed rinds semi softs and uniue to the British Isles the territorials and discover how best to enjoy them on a cheeseboard with a glass of Riesling or as a Welsh rarebit alongside a pint of Pale AleThis is a cheesemonger's odyssey a celebration of history innovation and taste and the book all cheese and history lovers will want to devour this Christmas


8 thoughts on “A Cheesemonger's History of The British Isles

  1. says:

    Only one complaint The cheeses didn't come with the book Well written mouth wateringly so Familiar with several of the cheeses and must go in pursuit of the Caerphilly produced not far away but I discover it is now made in SomersetIt is a Christmas present for my son; so to compensate him for obvious signs of pre reading I must attch some cheeseIf you like cheese then this is your book


  2. says:

    This deserves to be in the stocking this Christmas of every lover of good food and cheese in particular Palmer writes with wit and passion considerable knowledge and the benefit of a subtle palateNine tenths of the book is excellent; it falls to bits in the final chapter where he tries in a rush to do justice to the extraordinary wealth of the current British cheese culture Interestingly this is also where his editor the estimable Mark Ellingham also seems to have run out of energy or time There are some gross editing errorsBut by then the reader will have been well enough entertained to do hisher own research at the nearest fine cheese mongers


  3. says:

    This is a brilliant book Funny informative and just plain entertainingA perfect book for the Cheese lover in your life and eually great for those that don't like Cheese though we shouldn't socialise with such personsThe perfect Christmas present Buy a copy now


  4. says:

    Have you heard the one about Henry the Eighth and the washed rind cheeses? How about the shepherd boy dallying with his young love in a cave together with a bag of cheese?Most cheese lovers amass a bunch of stories about the object of their passion some demonstrably true some a mite whimsical perhaps Stories of Henry the Eighth are far memorable than a scientific explanation of the effect of B Linens on a cheeseHow do we learn these stories? In my case I went on a bunch of cheese courses and read a lot A LOT I’m sure we’ve all been asked time and time again which cheese is our favourite For a cheesemonger an interesting uestion might be to ask their favourite cheese book Mine? At times it’s been books by Pierre Androuet Juliet Harbutt Patricia Michaelson or latterly Bronwen Percival My current fave book on cheese is Ned Palmer’s A Cheesemonger’s History of the British IslesNed now runs the Cheese Tasting Company but was at Neal’s Yard Dairy for seven years or so – and knows his stuff He’s made cheese with a large number of UK makers and uses their cheeses to illustrate how the making of cheese in these isles has developed over the last six thousand years Along the way we learn of the impact of human migration the cheeses enjoyed by the builders of Stonehenge and the dietary results of conuests by the Romans and Normans He looks at how the Industrial Revolution impacted the cheese business with canals and later trains bringing dairy produce from distant farms to the growing cities For me the most valuable part of the book lies in the last chapters where he looks at the regeneration of British cheese following the Second World War and the knock out blow landed by rationing Thankfully British cheese got back up again and most of us can now enjoy a huge variety of high uality cheeses whether creamery or farmhouse made Ned talks about the people who were instrumental in the renaissance of our cheeses and looks at the impact of Rance Randolph Harbutt Dyas and others The current diversity of British cheese is celebrated in the chapter entitled Post Modern Cheeses Let a Thousand Cheeses Bloom The book concludes with a brief directory of ‘some favourite cheeses’The best music books should make one want to hear the tunes being written about This book made me salivate for some cheeses that I don’t yet knowA Cheesemonger’s History of the British Isles makes a great supplementary purchase for those who have Juliet Harbutt’s or Patricia Michaelson’s authoritative works


  5. says:

    A very entertaining account of the cheeses of Britain from Neolithic times to the present and their importance in history Packed with information I was particularly fascinated to read about the Nottingham Cheese War Of the 1760s A great book for any cheese lover


  6. says:

    A delightful educational stroll through the history of cheese making in the UK Any reader will be tempted to root out some local and or artisan cheeses having enjoyed this book If you like cheese read this


  7. says:

    Great information if you are a cheese lover Plan to travel around in uk trying the cheeses in our camper van I would have liked maps otherwise great little book


  8. says:

    Who'd have thought cheese history and humour would make such a sparkling book Learned about delicious cheeses discovered cheese pirates and enjoyed the wit of a dedicated affineur Makes an excellent gift